GREATER COMMUNITYCOUNCILS
The CCCOG exists to
resolve regional problems,
to determine policies, and
to formulate plans and
programs to meet regional
needs, to assist local
governments to execute
their governmental
responsibilities.

The Carbon County Council of Governments
(CCCOG) began in 2013 and was incorporated in
2015. We exist to provide municipalities with an
opportunity to work collaboratively to share
ideas, resources, and costs to better serve each
participating municipality. The CCCOG also forms
a stronger base when applying for State grants
because the resources ofthe CCCOG can serve a
larger number of Carbon County residents.
Representatives of 18 municipalities of theCCCOG
meet monthly,oftentimes sharing positive
experiences with vendors, thus the reason for
this letter in your hands.
Officers of CCOG

Kara  Scot, Chairperson, Bowmanstown Borough
Kris Hoffner, Vice Chairman, Palmerton Borough
Jay Miller, Treasurer, Jim Thorpe Borough
Cathy Hawk, Secretary, Parryville Borough
CARBON COUNTY COMMUNITIES

Beaver Meadows is located in northwestern Carbon County at 40°55′42″N 75°54′46″W (40.928438,
-75.912787) along Beaver Creek,[4] amidst a historic transportation corridor dating back to
Amerindian Trails through the wilderness area known to the Amerindians as "The Great Swamp".
The Great Swamp was part of a vastly greater wilderness once known as “St. Anthony’s
Wilderness” and by the Amerindians, the “Towamensing” being an Indian word for “wilderness”— a
vast pinewood forest and boggy swamp-plagued valleys watered by springs and mountain creeks
such as Quakake Creek, Beaver Creek, Hazel Creek and others from the surrounding mountains.
The Amerindians applied the term, “Towamensing” to the entire frontier area above the Blue
Mountain Ridge, which while a valued hunting territory was considered less favorable to Indian
settlements.
Beaver Meadow is at an elevation of 1,598 feet (487 m) above sea level in the valley of Beaver
Creek, north of Spring Mountain, part of the Ridge-and-Valley Appalachians. According to the
United States Census Bureau, the borough has a total area of 0.26 square miles (0.67 km2), all of it
land.

BEAVER MEADOWS BOROUGH
Secretary: Heather Williams
PO Box 215, 100 East Broad Street
Beaver Meadows, PA 18216-0215
Telephone #: (570) 455-7841
Fax #: (570) 455-5359
bmeadows@ptd.net
Tuesday–Wednesday-Thursday: 9:00 am to 2:00 pmV

Banks Township is located in western Carbon County and is bordered by Luzerne County to the
north and Schuylkill County to the west. Its southern border approximately follows the crest of
Spring Mountain. The township surrounds the borough of Beaver Meadows but is separate from it.

BANKS TOWNSHIP
Chairman: Joseph Clark
PO Box 231
Treskow, PA 18254
Telephone #: (570) 454-8291
Fax #: (570) 455-8249
jclark14@ptd.net
Co-Chair: Charles J. Schalles
Telephone #: (570) 454-8291

Bowmanstown is located in southern Carbon County at 40°48′3″N 75°39′44″W
(40.800737, -75.662167),[4] on the northeast bank of the Lehigh River. It is bordered on
the east and north by Lower Towamensing Township, on the southeast by the borough
of Palmerton, and on the southwest and west by East Penn Township.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough has a total area of 0.80
square miles (2.07 km2), of which 0.77 square miles (1.99 km2) is land and 0.03
square miles (0.07 km2), or 3.59%, is water.[3]

BOWMANSTOWN BOROUGH
Secretary: Tracy Burbage
490 Ore Street – PO Box 127
Bowmanstown, PA 18030
Telephone #: (610) 852-2455
Fax #: (610) 852-2444
bborough@ptd.net
Monday – Friday: 7am-3.30pm
Permit Officer/Zoning Officer: Duane Dellecker

East Penn Township is a rural township in the rough uplands
terrain of the eastern Mahoning Hills area of Carbon County,
Pennsylvania, United States; it has a complementary or sister
township, West Penn Township, directly to the west in Schuylkill
County. The township sits between two ridgelines of the
Ridge-and-Valley Appalachians, but with multiple hilltops, its
terrain is unlike many nearby valley floors between similar
ridgelines. The population was 2,881 at the 2010 United States
Census, up from 2,461 at the 2000 census
.

EAST PENN TOWNSHIP
Secretary: Jillyan A. Sterling
167 Municipal Road
Lehighton, PA 18235
Telephone #: (570) 386-5735
Fax #: (570) 386-4869
eptwp@ptd.net
Monday - Friday: 8:30am-4:30pm
Zoning Permit Officer: Carl Faustc
East Side is located in northern Carbon County at 41°3′39″N 75°45′
50″W (41.060844, -75.763973),[4] on the east side of the Lehigh
River. To the west, directly across the river, is the borough of
White Haven in Luzerne County.

Interstate 80 passes through the south side of the borough, with
access from Exit 274 (Pennsylvania Route 534) at the borough's
eastern border. Additional access is from Exit 273 in White Haven.
I-80 leads east 3 miles (5 km) to an interchange with Interstate
476 and 33 miles (53 km) to Stroudsburg near the Delaware Water
Gap, and west 14 miles (23 km) to Interstate 81 north of Hazleton.
According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough has a
total area of 1.15 square miles (2.99 km2), of which 1.15 square
miles (2.97 km2) is land and 0.0077 square miles (0.02 km2), or
0.54%, is water.

EAST SIDE BOROUGH
Secretary: Carol Ann Lenahan
100 North Sheaman Road
White Haven, Pa 18661
Home Phone: 443-7011
Permit Officer/Zoning Officer: Richard Clause
calenahan1@verizon.net
Franklin township is located in southern Carbon County and
is drained by the Lehigh River on its western boundary. The
northern boundary runs along the base of Bear Mountain.
Pohopoco Creek is the primary tributary of the Lehigh within
the township and is impounded in the township by Beltzville
Dam to form Beltzville Lake. Villages in the township include
Beltzville, East Weissport, Harrity, Long Run, North
Weissport, and Walcksville.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township
has a total area of 15.7 square miles (40.6 km2), of which
15.2 square miles (39.3 km2) is land and 0.50 square miles
(1.3 km2), or 3.27%, is water.[3] Franklin Township hosts the
Mahoning Valley Interchange of Interstate 476 with U.S.
Route 209. Pennsylvania Route 248 connects US 209 in
Weissport with the Allentown–Bethlehem area via Lehigh Gap.

FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP
Secretary: Brenda Neeb
900 Fairyland Road
Lehighton, PA 18235
Telephone #: (610) 377-1773
Fax #: (610) 377-7521
ftsupers@ptd.net
Township Office Hours: Monday – Thursday: 8am-4:30pm
(Closed 12 Noon – 1:00 pm) Friday – 8:00am – 12:00
Permit Officer: (UCC-Uniform Construction Code) Carl Faust,
Blue Mt. Inspection Services
Zoning Officer: Carl Faust, Blue Mtn Inspection Services
(Hours – Monday 6 pm – 8 pm)
Jim Thorpe is a borough and the county seat of Carbon County
in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. The population was 4,781 at
the 2010 census.The town has been called the "Switzerland of
America" due to the picturesque scenery, mountainous
location, and architecture ; as well as the "Gateway to the
Poconos[citation needed]." It is in eastern Pennsylvania about
80 miles (130 km) north of Philadelphia and 100 miles (160 km)
west of New York City. This town is also historically known as
the burial site for the body of Native American sports legend
Jim Thorpe.

JIM THORPE BOROUGH
Secretary: Louise McClafferty
101 East Tenth Street
Jim Thorpe, PA 18229
Telephone #: (570) 325-3025 x 3
Fax #: (570) 325-8154
secretary@jtborough.org
Monday – Friday: 8:30am-4:30pm
Zoning Officer: Barry Isett & Assoc – Rick Harmon 570-455-2999
x 3382
Kidder Township occupies the northern end of Carbon County
and is bordered by Luzerne County to the north and west and by
Monroe County to the east. It is drained by the Lehigh River,
which separates it from Luzerne County. Tobyhanna Creek, a
tributary of the Lehigh, forms the northern half of the
township's eastern border. Its villages include Albrightsville
(also in Penn Forest Township), Hickory Run, Lake Harmony,
Lehigh Tannery, Leonardsville/Pocono Mountain Lake Estates,
and Split Rock. Albrightsville is a census-designated place as is
Holiday Pocono within Kidder.
According to the United States Census Bureau, the township
has a total area of 69.8 square miles (180.8 km2), of which 69.1
square miles (178.9 km2) is land and 0.73 square miles (1.9
km2), or 1.04%, is water.[4] Hickory Run State Park occupies
nearly 16,000 acres (65 km2) in the southern half of the
township.

KIDDER TOWNSHIP
Township Manager: Lisa M. Klem
P.O. Box 576
Lake Harmony, PA 18624
Telephone #: (570) 722-0107
Fax #: (570) 722-5636
Kidder.admin@pa.metrocast.net
Monday – Friday: 8am-4.00pm
Permit Officer/Zoning Officer: Virginia Compton
Jim Thorpe is a borough and the county seat of Carbon County
in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. The population was 4,781 at
the 2010 census.The town has been called the "Switzerland of
America" due to the picturesque scenery, mountainous
location, and architecture ; as well as the "Gateway to the
Poconos[citation needed]." It is in eastern Pennsylvania about
80 miles (130 km) north of Philadelphia and 100 miles (160 km)
west of New York City. This town is also historically known as
the burial site for the body of Native American sports legend
Jim Thorpe.

JIM THORPE BOROUGH
Secretary: Louise McClafferty
101 East Tenth Street
Jim Thorpe, PA 18229
Telephone #: (570) 325-3025 x 3
Fax #: (570) 325-8154
secretary@jtborough.org
Monday – Friday: 8:30am-4:30pm
Zoning Officer: Barry Isett & Assoc – Rick Harmon 570-455-2999
x 3382
Jim Thorpe is a borough and the county seat of Carbon County
in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. The population was 4,781 at
the 2010 census.The town has been called the "Switzerland of
America" due to the picturesque scenery, mountainous
location, and architecture ; as well as the "Gateway to the
Poconos[citation needed]." It is in eastern Pennsylvania about
80 miles (130 km) north of Philadelphia and 100 miles (160 km)
west of New York City. This town is also historically known as
the burial site for the body of Native American sports legend
Jim Thorpe.

JIM THORPE BOROUGH
Secretary: Louise McClafferty
101 East Tenth Street
Jim Thorpe, PA 18229
Telephone #: (570) 325-3025 x 3
Fax #: (570) 325-8154
secretary@jtborough.org
Monday – Friday: 8:30am-4:30pm
Zoning Officer: Barry Isett & Assoc – Rick Harmon 570-455-2999
x 3382

Lansford is a county-border borough (town) in Carbon County,
Pennsylvania, United States, located 37 miles (60 km) northwest
of Allentown and 19 miles south of Hazleton in the Panther Creek
Valley about 72 miles (116 km) from Greater Philadelphia[a] and
abutting the cross-county sister-city of Coaldale in Schuylkill
County. The whole valley was owned and subdivided into
separate lots by the historically important Lehigh Coal &
Navigation Company (locally called "the Old Company") which
likely settled some structures on the lands by 1827.[b]
Lansford grew with the development of local anthracite coal
mines, and was named after Asa Lansford Foster, who was an
advocate for merging the small "patch towns" that developed in
the area surrounding the anthracite coal mines. The population
was 3,941 at the 2010 Census, a steep decline from a high of
9,632 at the 1930 census common to many mining towns in
northeastern Pennsylvania.[4]

LANSFORD BOROUGH
Secretary: Jill Seigendall
1 West Ridge St.
Lansford, PA 18232
Telephone #: (570) 645-3900
Fax #: (570) 645-2648
admin1@lansfordboro.com
Monday – Friday: 8:00am-4:30pm
Permit Officer/Zoning : James G. Dean

Lausanne Township is a township in Carbon County,
Pennsylvania, United States, dating back to 1808 when the first
Lausanne settlement was organized with a local frontier
government. The original population of Lausanne Landing was
quite variable limited to a handful of year round settlers and
varying groups of itinerant workmen from expeditions sent to
log, mine, or build boats. The current town population was 237
at the 2010 census.[3] The township was named after
Lausanne, in Switzerland[4] and the bowl shaped valley near its
first settlement at Lausanne Landing has often been called the
Switzerland of America.

LAUSANNE TOWNSHIP
Secretary: Agnes K. Klynowsky
143 North Stagecoach Road
Weatherly, PA 18255
Telephone #: (570) 427-4029
Monday – Friday 1pm-7pm
Permit Officer: Tino Nocchi

Lehigh township is located in north-central Carbon County and is
bordered to the north partially by Luzerne County. The Lehigh
River forms the winding eastern border of the township, carving
a gorge up to 1,000 feet (300 m) deep. The township's villages
include Leslie Run and Rockport. The borough of Weatherly is on
the western side of the township but is a separate municipality

LEHIGH TOWNSHIP
Secretary: Carol Lenahan
1741 South Lehigh Gorge Drive
Weatherly, PA 18255       
Telephone #: (570) 427-4950
Fax #: (570) 427-4950
lehightownship@outlook.com   
Zoning Officer: Leonard Weston
n

Lehighton (/li'hɑitən/) is a borough in Carbon County,
Pennsylvania, United States, 77 miles (124 km) north of
Philadelphia, and 54 miles (87 km) south of Scranton. In the
past, it developed early industries because of water power from
the Lehigh River. With the location of a repair facility here and
its regional operations, the Lehigh Valley Railroad became for
years a major employer of thousands of people from the area.
Post-World War II railroad and industry restructuring led to job
and population losses.

From a peak of nearly 7,000 in 1940, the population was 5,500 at
the 2010 census.[4] Lehighton is the most populous borough in
Carbon County and still the business hub of the county.

LEHIGHTON BOROUGH
Nicole Beckett, Borough Manager
One Constitution Ave
PO Box 29
Lehighton, PA 18235
Telephone #: (610) 377-4002
Fax #: (610) 377-6638
nbeckett@lehightonborough.com
Permit Officer/Zoning Officer: Tim Dow
Monday – Friday: 8:30am-4:30pm

nc

Lower Towamensing Township is in southeastern
Carbon County and is bordered by Northampton County
to the south and Monroe County to the east. According
to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a
total area of 21.30 square miles (55.17 km2), of which
21.25 square miles (55.05 km2) is land and 0.05 square
miles (0.12 km2), or 0.21%, is water.[4] It is drained by
tributaries (Aquashicola Creek, etc.) of the Lehigh River
which separates it from East Penn Township, and its
southern geographic boundary is Blue Mountain.
Villages in the township include Aquashicola (locally
pronounced "ack-wa-SHIK-la"), Christian Corner, Hazard,
and Little Gap (which hosts the Blue Mountain Ski Area).
Pennsylvania Route 248 passes through the
westernmost parts of the township, following the Lehigh
River, and connects Lehighton to the northwest with the
Allentown–Bethlehem area to south, as well as having
nearby interchanges in Palmerton and Bowmanstown

LOWER TOWAMENSING TOWNSHIP
Secretary: Christine Wentz
595 Hahns Dairy Road
Palmerton, PA 18071
Telephone #: (610) 826-2522
Fax #: (610) 826-2585
lowertow@ptd.net
Monday – Friday: 8-4:30pm
Permit Officer/Zoning Officer: Duane Dellecker (Tuesday
5 pm – 7 pm)x

Mahoning Township is in southwestern Carbon County in the
valley of Mahoning Creek, a tributary of the Lehigh River. The
township is bordered by the borough of Lehighton to the
northeast and by Schuylkill County to the southwest. It is
situated near the northeastern end of the Mahoning Hills,[4]
the mountainous foothills region to the west of the Lehigh
River.
According to the United States Census Bureau, the township
has a total area of 23.8 square miles (61.6 km2), of which 23.7
square miles (61.3 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.3 km2),
or 0.48%, is water.[3] It is drained by Mahoning Creek, a
tributary of the Lehigh River, which forms parts of the
township's eastern boundary. The natural northern boundary
with Jim Thorpe and Summit Hill is on the south slope of
Mauch Chunk Ridge. Its villages include Dry Tavern,
Jamestown, Mahoning Valley (also in West Penn Township,
Schuylkill County), New Mahoning, Normal Square, and
Packerton.
Mahoning's numbered routes include Pennsylvania Route 443,
which crosses from U.S. Route 209 on Lehighton's south side
west to Route 309 in South Tamaqua, Schuylkill County, and
PA 902, which comes southeast over Mauch Chunk Ridge from
US 209 in Lansford and Summit Hill to New Mahoning, then
turns east to PA 443 in Lehighton with access to US 209 in
downtown via Mahoning Street. 209 proceeds north through
the township between Lehighton and Jim Thorpe, although
this segment is signed southbound.


MAHONING TOWNSHIP
Secretary: Natalie D. Haggerty
Mahoning Township
2685 Mahoning Drive East
Lehighton, PA 18235
Telephone #: (570) 386-4002
Fax #: (570) 386-3615
mahtwp@ptd.net
Monday – Friday: 9am-4pm
Permit Officer: Carl Faust, BCO
Zoning Officer: LeRoy Leibenguth  570-386-5431
cx

Nesquehoning is a borough in Carbon County,
Pennsylvania, United States and is the largest Borough in
Pennsylvania. The population was 3,349 at the 2010
census.[3] The name is of Native American origin,
commonly believed to signify "narrow valley;" however
native language scholars translate the name as "at the
black lick" or "at the dirty lick," referring to mineral licks
frequented by deer or other animals.[4] Nesquehoning
was established as a result of the anthracite coal mining
industry. It was incorporated as a borough in 1963
(effective in 1964),[5] having previously been a part of
Mauch Chunk Township west of the Lehigh River.

NESQUEHONING BOROUGH
Secretary/Treasurer: Roni Sue Ahner
114 West Catawissa Street
Nesquehoning, PA 18240
Telephone #: (570) 669-9588
Fax #: (570) 669-9301
Nesqboro@ptd.net
Monday – Friday: 8am – 4pm
Zoning Officer: Gene Kennedy (570) 669-9048

cxc

Packer township is in the western part of Carbon County
and is bounded by Schuylkill County on the west.
According to the United States Census Bureau, the
township has a total area of 27.9 square miles (72.3 km2),
all of it land.[3] It is in the Delaware River watershed and is
drained by Quakake Creek, a tributary of the Lehigh River,
except for a portion in the southwest that is drained by the
Schuylkill River via Still Creek and the Little Schuylkill
River. Its villages include Gerhards, Hudsondale, and
Stewarts.

Broad Mountain, reaching an elevation of 1,804 feet (550
m) above sea level, occupies the southern half of the
township, while Spring Mountain is along the northern
border and has a high point of 1,913 feet (583 m). Between
the two mountains is the valley of Quakake Creek, the
settled part of the township, with elevations from 1,050 to
1,300 feet (320 to 400 m). Pennsylvania Route 93 passes
through the township, crossing Quakake Creek in
Hudsondale and leading northwest across Spring Mountain
7 miles (11 km) to Hazleton and southeast across Broad
Mountain 8 miles (13 km) to Jim Thorpe, the Carbon County
seat. .

PACKER TOWNSHIP
Secretary: Stephanie Stolpe
2234 Hudson Drive
Weatherly, PA 18255
Telephone #: (570) 427-8969
Fax #: (570) 427-4110
Permit Officer/Zoning Officer: Martin Cicowic


cxcxzzx

Nesquehoning is a borough in Carbon County,
Pennsylvania, United States and is the largest Borough in
Pennsylvania. The population was 3,349 at the 2010
census.[3] The name is of Native American origin,
commonly believed to signify "narrow valley;" however
native language scholars translate the name as "at the
black lick" or "at the dirty lick," referring to mineral licks
frequented by deer or other animals.[4] Nesquehoning
was established as a result of the anthracite coal mining
industry. It was incorporated as a borough in 1963
(effective in 1964),[5] having previously been a part of
Mauch Chunk Township west of the Lehigh River.

NESQUEHONING BOROUGH
Secretary/Treasurer: Roni Sue Ahner
114 West Catawissa Street
Nesquehoning, PA 18240
Telephone #: (570) 669-9588
Fax #: (570) 669-9301
Nesqboro@ptd.net
Monday – Friday: 8am – 4pm
Zoning Officer: Gene Kennedy (570) 669-9048

cxc

Nesquehoning is a borough in Carbon County,
Pennsylvania, United States and is the largest Borough in
Pennsylvania. The population was 3,349 at the 2010
census.[3] The name is of Native American origin,
commonly believed to signify "narrow valley;" however
native language scholars translate the name as "at the
black lick" or "at the dirty lick," referring to mineral licks
frequented by deer or other animals.[4] Nesquehoning
was established as a result of the anthracite coal mining
industry. It was incorporated as a borough in 1963
(effective in 1964),[5] having previously been a part of
Mauch Chunk Township west of the Lehigh River.

NESQUEHONING BOROUGH
Secretary/Treasurer: Roni Sue Ahner
114 West Catawissa Street
Nesquehoning, PA 18240
Telephone #: (570) 669-9588
Fax #: (570) 669-9301
Nesqboro@ptd.net
Monday – Friday: 8am – 4pm
Zoning Officer: Gene Kennedy (570) 669-9048

cxc

Nesquehoning is a borough in Carbon County,
Pennsylvania, United States and is the largest Borough in
Pennsylvania. The population was 3,349 at the 2010
census.[3] The name is of Native American origin,
commonly believed to signify "narrow valley;" however
native language scholars translate the name as "at the
black lick" or "at the dirty lick," referring to mineral licks
frequented by deer or other animals.[4] Nesquehoning
was established as a result of the anthracite coal mining
industry. It was incorporated as a borough in 1963
(effective in 1964),[5] having previously been a part of
Mauch Chunk Township west of the Lehigh River.

NESQUEHONING BOROUGH
Secretary/Treasurer: Roni Sue Ahner
114 West Catawissa Street
Nesquehoning, PA 18240
Telephone #: (570) 669-9588
Fax #: (570) 669-9301
Nesqboro@ptd.net
Monday – Friday: 8am – 4pm
Zoning Officer: Gene Kennedy (570) 669-9048

cxc

Palmerton is located in southern Carbon County at 40°48′11″N 75°
36′43″W (40.803077, -75.611808).[8] It lies just north of the
junction of the Lehigh River and Aquashicola Creek, which in turn
is just north of the Lehigh Gap through Blue Mountain. To the
north of Palmerton is Stony Ridge.

The borough is located 3 miles (5 km) east of Bowmanstown and 5
miles (8 km) north of the twin towns of Walnutport and Slatington,
7 miles (11 km) southeast of Lehighton, and 58 miles (93 km)
south of the city of Scranton. Palmerton's elevation is 407 feet
(124 m) above sea level.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough has a
total area of 2.54 square miles (6.57 km2), of which 2.48 square
miles (6.43 km2) is land and 0.05 square miles (0.13 km2), or
2.00%, is water.[3]

The layout of Palmerton's streets and alleys is extremely regular,
because most of the town was planned and built by the New
Jersey Zinc Company. Avenues, which run east to west, contain
the majority of addresses and are named for colleges and
universities. Streets, running perpendicular, are numbered from
First Street in the west to Eighth Street in the east. Most of the
houses in the central and southern parts of town (near the zinc
plants) are "doubles"—one building divided down the center into
two residences.

PALMERTON BOROUGH
Secretary: Rodger P. Danielson
443 Delaware Avenue
Palmerton, PA 18071
Telephone #: (610) 826-2505
Fax #: (610) 826-4386
pmtnboro@ptd.net
Monday – Friday: 8:30am-4:30pm
Permit Officer/Zoning Officer: Duane Dellecker



cxcxzz

Parryville is a borough in Carbon County, Pennsylvania, United
States. The population was 525 at the 2010 census.[3]
Parryville is located 3 miles (5 km) southeast of Lehighton and
1 mile (1.6 km) north of Bowmanstown off Route 248 and 4
miles (6 km) northwest of Palmerton. Parryville's elevation is
450 feet (140 m) above sea level.

Parryville is located in southern Carbon County at 40°49′28″N
75°40′9″W (40.824403, -75.669246),[4] along Pohopoco Creek
just north of its confluence with the Lehigh River. Interstate
476 (the Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike)
passes through the western part of the borough, with access
from Exit 74 (U.S. Route 209) just north of the borough limits. I-
476 leads south 20 miles (32 km) to the Allentown area and
north 50 miles (80 km) to Scranton.

According to the United States Census Bureau, Parryville has a
total area of 1.63 square miles (4.22 km2), of which 1.61 square
miles (4.17 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.04 km2), or
1.03%, is water.[3]

PARRYVILLE BOROUGH
Secretary: Dana Brubaker
PO Box 10
Parryville, PA 18244
Telephone #: (610) 852-3800
Fax #: (610)-852-3800
parryvilleboro@gmail.com
www.parryville.org



cxcxzzx
Penn's Forest Township is the largest by area in Carbon
County, occupying a sizable portion of the eastern side of
the county. According to the United States Census Bureau,
the township has a total area of 74.9 square miles (193.9
km2), of which 73.8 square miles (191.2 km2) is land and 1.0
square mile (2.7 km2), or 1.40%, is water.[3] It is drained by
the Lehigh River, which meanders along Penn Forest's
western border through the Lehigh Gorge. Mud Run, a
tributary of the Lehigh, forms the northern border of the
township. Its villages include Christmans, Christmansville,
and Meckesville, and its census-designated places are
Albrightsville (also in Kidder Township), Indian Mountain
Lake (also in Monroe County), and Towamensing Trails. A
small portion of Hickory Run State Park is in the north along
Mud Run.

The township's numbered roads include Pennsylvania Route
903, which crosses from northeast to southwest, and
Pennsylvania Route 534, which crosses in the east and
intersects PA 903 in Albrightsville. Other important roads
include Hatchery Road, Maury Road, and Schock Mill Road.
Interstate 476 (Pennsylvania Turnpike Northeast Extension)
crosses Penn Forest north-to-south with access at an
E-ZPass-only interchange with PA 903 and indirect access
from the Mahoning Valley interchange to the south and the
Pocono interchanges to the north.

PENN FOREST TOWNSHIP
Secretary: Susan Gibiser
Penn Forest Township
2010 State Route 903
Jim Thorpe, PA 18229
Telephone #: (570) 325-2768
Fax #:(570) 325-8230
pftsec@ptd.net
Permit Officer: Barry Isett & Associates
Zoning Officer: Barry Isett & Associates
Summit Hill is a borough in Carbon County, Pennsylvania,
United States. The population was 3,034 at the 2010 census.
[3] The hamlet has a storied history as the western terminus
of the United States' second operational railway, the Mauch
Chunk & Summit Hill Railway, and some of the earliest coal
mines developed in North America, where the Lehigh Coal
Mining Company began mining in 1792, establishing the town
as little more than a mining camp with stables and paddocks

Summit Hill is located in western Carbon County at 40°49′39″
N 75°51′57″W (40.827420, -75.865892).[8] The main
development of the borough is on the crest of Pisgah
Mountain, but the borough limits extend north to the
ridgecrest of Nesquehoning Mountain, south to the far side of
Mauch Chunk Ridge, and east to cover most of Mauch Chunk
Lake. Also on the northern border is the borough of Lansford,
while Tamaqua in Schuylkill County is on the western border.
.



SUMMIT HILL BOROUGH
Secretary: Kira Steber
40 West Amidon Street
Telephone #: (570) 645-2305
Fax #: (570) 645 9449
shboro@ptd.net
Monday – Friday: 8am -4pm
Zoning / Permit Officer: William Kirklosky

Towamensing Township is a lightly populated rural township in
eastern Carbon County, Pennsylvania, United States. The
Delaware Peoples name is eponymous and was once applied by
the natives to the whole region[3] of Carbon County and bits of
the Poconos to the north (Luzerne County) and to Schuylkill
County (southwest). The population was 4,477 at the 2010 census,
[4] up from 3,475 at the 2000 census. A portion of Beltzville State
Park is in the township.

Towamensing Township is in southeastern Carbon County and is
bordered by Monroe County to the east. According to the United
States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 28.9
square miles (74.9 km2), of which 27.1 square miles (70.3 km2) is
land and 1.8 square miles (4.6 km2), or 6.15%, is water.[4] It is
drained by Aquashicola Creek and Pohopoco Creek into the
Lehigh River. The township's northern boundary runs along the
base of Call Mountain. Its villages include Forest Inn, Jonesville,
Stemlersville, and Trachsville. U.S. Route 209 crosses it east-to-
west on the south side of Beltzville Lake


TOWAMENSING TOWNSHIP
Secretary: Brenda L. Drew
120 Stable Road
Lehighton, PA 18235
Telephone #: (610) 681-4202
Fax #: (610) 681-3700
info@towamensingtownship.com
Monday – Friday 8am – 4pm (Closed 12 Noon – 12:30 pm)
Permit Officer/Zoning Officer: Carl Faust (Monday 5 pm – 7 pm

Weatherly is a borough in Carbon County, Pennsylvania, United
States, located 12 miles (19 km) northwest of Jim Thorpe and
28 miles (45 km) south of Wilkes-Barre. Early in the twentieth
century, there were silk mills, foundries, a candy factory, a
fabricating plant, and a cigar factory. In 1900 2,471 people
lived there, and in 1910, the population was 2,501. The
population was 2,525 at the 2010 census.[3]

Originally called "Black Creek", it received a name change to
"Weatherly" in 1848. Clock-maker David Weatherly, also an
executive of the Beaver Meadow Railroad, made an agreement
with the town that he would build them a clock if they would
rename the town "Weatherly". They changed the name of the
town to Weatherly, however David Weatherly returned to
Philadelphia to be treated for cancer and died before he could
build the promised clock. Charles and Eurana Schwab funded
the clock that was built into the clock tower on top of the
town's school, but the town kept the name Weatherly

Weatherly is located in northwestern Carbon County at 40°56′
25″N 75°49′36″W (40.940257, -75.826722).[4] It is situated at an
elevation of 1,100 feet (340 m) above sea level in the Ridge-and-
Valley Province of the Appalachian Mountains, between Spring
Mountain and Round Head Mountain to the north and Broad
Mountain to the south.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough
has a total area of 2.98 square miles (7.72 km2), all of it land.[3]


WEATHERLY BOROUGH
Secretary: Lori O’Donnell
10 Wilbur Street
Weatherly, PA 18255
Telephone #: (570) 427-8640
Fax #: (570) 427-8679
Weatherly1@verizon.net
Monday – Friday: 7:30am – 4pm
Permit Officer/Zoning Officer: Harold J. Pudliner, JR
Weissport is located in southern Carbon County at 40°49′
45″N 75°42′3″W (40.829105, -75.700817).[9] It is on the
east side of the Lehigh River, situated on low ground
between the river and the former Lehigh Canal. To the
west, across the river, is the much larger borough of
Lehighton. Weissport was a central hub during the Lehigh
Coal and Navigation Canal era. The town served as the
only boat building and repair facility along the Lehigh
Canal. Today, the Lehigh Canal Park is a gem of nature
and history for residents and visitors alike. The town is
one of the cultural and historic resources along the
Delaware and Lehigh National Heritage Corridor.
U.S. Route 209 passes through Weissport, leading west
into Lehighton and east 2 miles (3 km) to Interstate 476,
the Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike. I-
476 leads north 45 miles (72 km) to Scranton and south
25 miles (40 km) to the Allentown area.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the
borough has a total area of 0.16 square miles (0.41 km2),
of which 0.14 square miles (0.35 km2) is land and 0.02
square miles (0.06 km2), or 13.92%, is water.[3]
Weissport's elevation is 475 feet (145 m) above sea level.


WEISSPORT BOROUGH
Secretary:
440 Allen Street
Weissport, PA 18235
Telephone #: (610) 377-5606
Fax #: (610) 377-5606
weisport@ptd.net
Zoning Officer: Duane Dellecker
Pennsylvania
Written and Composed by
Eddie Khoury and Ronnie Bonner

Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania,
Mighty is your name,
Steeped in glory and tradition,
Object of acclaim,
Where brave men fought the foe of freedom,
Tyranny decried,
‘Til the bell of independence filled the countryside.
Chorus
Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania,
May your future be filled with honor everlasting as your history.
Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania,
Blessed by God’s own hand,
Birthplace of a mighty nation,
Keystone of the land.
Where first our country’s flag unfolded,
Freedom to proclaim,
May the voices of tomorrow glorify your name.
Chorus
Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania,
May your future be filled with honor everlasting as your history.

The official state song of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania was
adopted by the General Assembly and signed into law by Governor
Robert P. Casey on November 29, 1990.
PA Anthem