Lookouts for the
Neighborhood
At loci municipiis
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Neighborhood Associations

Neighborhood associations draw people closer to
their city government and closer still to their fellow
neighbors. Neighborhood participation gives
residents a stronger, united voice

Neighborhood associations are inclusive, reflecting
the diversity, which enriches a community. Members
include families, singles, retired people, youths,
business owners, faith-based organizations,
schools, homeowners, and renters.

Often, neighborhood organizations commissions on
a variety of topics, including:

· Land Use (zone changes,
variances, subdivisions, zoning
ordinances
· Street development, traffic control
and patterns
· Park, open spaces
· Recreational services
· Library programs
· Budget allocations
· Social services
· Crime prevention
· Capital improvements

Neighborhood associations make it possible for local
residents to have agreater influence over issues,
programs and projects that affect their
neighborhoods.

They offer a local forum for citizen deliberation of key
issues at the local level and provide a recognized
vehicle for communicating citizen views’ to City Hall
A neighborhood watch , also called a crime watch or neighbourhood crime watch,
is an organized group of civilians devoted to crime and vandalism prevention
within a neighborhood.

The aim of neighborhood watch includes educating residents of a community on
security and safety and achieving safe and secure neighborhoods. However,
when a criminal activity is suspected, members are encouraged to report to
authorities, and not to intervene.

In the United States, neighborhood watch builds on the concept of a town watch
from Colonial America.

The town watch program is similar to that of the neighborhood watch. The major
difference is that the Town Watch tend to actively patrol in pseudo-uniforms, i.e.
marked vests or jackets and caps, and is equipped with two way radios to directly
contact the local police. The Town Watch serves as an auxiliary to the police
which provides weapons (if any), equipment, and training. The town watch usually
returns their gear at the end of their duty.

Like the town watchman of colonial America, each civilian must take an active
interest in protecting his or her neighbors and be willing to give his or her time and
effort to this volunteer activity.

Other programs similar to Neighborhood Watch include Operation Identification, a
citizen's burglary prevention program for use in homes and businesses that was
developed in the United States during the 1960s.


Please consider for a moment that if you would become a victim of a
crime…Wouldn't you be grateful if someone would lend a hand?  
Even if only to call the police.  It is up to everyone to pay attention to
what is going on around them and to  CALL THE POLICE whenever it
is necessary

Dennis Pearson
President East Allentown
Rittersvlle Neighborhood
Association  Inc, 1976
-2019 ... President
Allentown Crime Watch
2013- 2019
PEOPLE OF
NEIGHBORHOODS
Patty Engler - 8th
Ward Civic Association
Robert Jacoby - East
Allentown Rittersville
Neighborhood
Association
Janet Keshl (left)
Mountainville 30  is in
picture with Dennis
Pearson (right)
Allentown Crime
Watch President at
2019 Leonard Buck
Banquet held at the
Palace Center in East
Allentown
Richard Wilburn -
Mideay Manor (left) is
with David Keshl -
Mountainville 30 (right)
Allentown Police
Department Captain Bob
Ring Promotes the Check
Mate and Operation ID
programs with people from
one or more of the former
Allentown Community of
Neighborhood
Organizations
Delegates from Allentown
neighborhoods meet as a
Board at a Community of
Neighborhoods Organization
meeting
The  President's Council of the
Allentown Crime Watch sponsored a
Police Appreciation at Trinity Lutheran
Church in South Allentown in 2019 ...
Pictured here are a few of many police
officers who were served with those
neighborhood people whom served
them
1981 - Dennis Pearson of the East
Allentown Rittersville Neighborhood
Association (left) receives gavel from
CNO Vice President Arlene Wallach of
the South Mountain Area Residents and
Taxpayers (SMART)  upon his election
as President.